Candied salmon ice cream takes top honors

Candied salmon ice cream by Coppa, a Juneau shop owned by Marc Wheeler, won the grand prize at the 2017 Alaska Symphony of Seafood.
Photo courtesy of Alaska Symphony of Seafood

Candied salmon ice cream from Coppa, a Juneau coffee shop serving hand-crafted ice cream, organic coffee, teas and baked goods, has taken top honors in the 2017 Alaska Symphony of Seafoods.

The candied salmon ice cream won the grand prize, Symphony organizers announced during the Juneau legislative reception and awards ceremony in Juneau on the evening of Feb. 22.

SeaFare Pacific Salmon Chowder by Oregon Seafoods won the People’s Choice award during the Symphony’s Seattle gala on Jan. 25. The winner of the Juneau People’s Choice award was not immediately available.

SeaFare Pacific Salmon Chowder by Oregon Seafoods won the People’s Choice award during the Symphony’s Seattle gala on Jan. 25. Photo courtesy of Alaska Symphony of Seafood

Candied salmon ice cream also took top honors in food service competition, followed by Odyssey’s seafood Cakes with Dungeness crab in second place, and Orca Bay Seafoods’ Orca Bay’s Albondiagas (Mexican Seafood Soup) in third place.

Dear North – Alaska Salmon Bites by Authentic Alaska LLC claimed first place honors in retail competition.  Second place in retail competition went to Orca Bay’s Jjamppeng (Korean Seafood Noodle Soup), and Bambinos Baby Food placed third with Sockeye Salmon Bisque.

In the Beyond the Plate competition, Tidal Vision’s Crystal Clarity, for keeping pools crystal clear, took top honors. Photo courtesy of Alaska Symphony of Seafood

In the Beyond the Plate competition, Tidal Vision’s Crystal Clarity, for keeping pools crystal clear, took top honors. Second place went to Trident Seafoods’ Alaska Naturals Alaska Salmon Pet Oil, and third place went to a salmon leather clutch by Tidal Vision.

Crystal Clarity is a chitoasm-based swimming pool clarifier. This proprietary method of extracting chitin and making chitosan from Alaska Opilio crab shells is an eco-friendly closed loop manufacturing process.

Triad Fisheries’ Bruce Gore Coho salmon Bottarga placed first among Beyond the Egg competitors, and Trident Seafoods’ Sake Flavored Pollock Roe placed second.

Beyond the Plate entries must be manufactured from seafood waste, or be byproducts of the primary processing. The Beyond the Egg category broadly includes products made from roe or uni.

Triad Fisheries’ Bruce Gore Coho salmon Bottarga placed first among Beyond the Egg competitors in the Symphony’s 2017 competition.
Photo courtesy of
Alaska Symphony of Seafood

Symphony officials said their take on what’s called Bottarga in Europe or Karasumi in Japan is the salt cured salmon roe full of Umami can be grated on pasta or sliced and placed on rice. This is the first time salmon roe has been used to make Bottarga.  The original recipe dates back to the 1500s in Italy when Red Mullet roe was salt cured and used to flavor foods.

All entries were evaluated by a panel of judges, based on the product’s packaging and presentation, overall eating/consumer experience, price and potential for commercial success.

All first place winners are given transportation to and a place to display their winning products at Seafood Expo North America in Boston in March.

Major sponsors of the 2017 competition included the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, Alaska Air Cargo, Aleutian Pribilof Islands Community Development Association, At-Sea Processors Association, Bristol Bay Economic Development Association, Marel, Northwest Fisheries Association, Trident Seafoods, UniSea, and United Fishermen of Alaska.

The competition began in 1993, under the auspices of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation, a private, non-profit organization created in 1978 to further develop Alaska’s seafood industry by utilizing a broad perspective of seafood harvesters, processors and support sector businesses. Since its inception, AFDF has been dedicated to identifying problems common to the seafood industry in Alaska and developing sustainable solutions that provide benefits to the economy, environment and communities.

More information about AFDF is online at 

www.afdf.org

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Margaret Bauman is a veteran Alaska journalist focused on covering fisheries and environmental issues. Bauman has been writing for The Cordova Times since 2010. You can reach her at mbauman@thecordovatimes.com.