19.4 F
Cordova, AK
Sunday, January 21, 2018
As we continue the bowling story in Cordova, after the opening of the Club Bowl, leagues formed immediately — many were already forming before the Club Bowl even opened. A teen league also formed and Dick Barton donated the bowling ball he won to the most improved bowler in the Teen League after the 12 games of the season were played. Although a big percentage of the people in Cordova knew little about bowling, classes were started, associations and leagues were formed, balls and shoes were picked out and bowling began in earnest. In the early spring of 1963, the Women’s Association sent two teams to Fairbanks for the State Tournament. It would make a good story to say the new kids on the block won all the trophies but alas that only happens in fairy tales and only a few minor triumphs were realized on the lanes.

Museum Memories: Jan. 20, 2018

As we continue the bowling story in Cordova, after the opening of the Club Bowl, leagues formed immediately — many were already forming before...
Ken and Don VanBrocklin and Bill Sherman decided to expand their business to include an eight-lane bowling alley. The plans were drawn, and construction began in the summer of ’62. The interior equipment was to be all A.M.F. automated equipment and the new, design of rounded seating arrangements. The Club Bowl was set to house an average of 100-150 bowlers who could bowl in four or five leagues. The grand opening at the new Club Bowl was a huge success and as the Cordova Times reported: “a good time was had by all!” Flowers were in abundance around the bowling center with congratulations from well-wishes, which added to the festive atmosphere. After the opening ceremonies, the serious league play began. Cliff Webber of Anchorage was the first bowler to roll a 200 game after the official ceremonies were over. In this photo, Bill and Kay Sherman celebrate! This photo came from the archives and collections of the Cordova Historical Society housed within the museum. The museum is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Saturdays from Noon until 5 p.m. Stop by to see our new exhibit in the Copper River Gallery, “Winter White” featuring all local artists!

Museum Memories: January 13, 2018

Ken and Don VanBrocklin and Bill Sherman decided to expand their business to include an eight-lane bowling alley. The plans were drawn, and construction...
Did you know there was a bowling alley in Cordova in 1908? How about a bowling alley in Cordova in the 1960s? Enjoy an evening of Cordova bowling history on Monday, Jan. 22, when the museum presents “The History of Bowling in Cordova!” Club Bowl’s story began when a team of brothers and their partner decided to expand their booming bar business. Don Van Brocklin and William A. Sherman purchased the bar in 1940 from the Baddon family. Bill entered the military service 1942 and Bob Van Brocklin became a partner in the same year. Bob Van Brocklin died in a plane crash in 1944. Don kept his interest in the business and in 1955 his brother Ken bought in. Bill rejoined the group in 1959 as a partner and in 1962 they began the plans for the bowling alley. Stay tuned for more! This photo came from the archives and collections of the Cordova Historical Society housed within the museum. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Stop by to see our new exhibit in the Copper River Gallery, “Winter White” featuring all local artists.

Museum Memories: January 6, 2017

Did you know there was a bowling alley in Cordova in 1908? How about a bowling alley in Cordova in the 1960s?  Enjoy an...

Museum Memories: December 30, 2017

For the first 20 miles, the Copper River and Northwest Railway route followed old Eyak trails from the lake to Alaganic slough. Plenty of...
In the early days of construction of the Copper River and Northwest Railway, the company property in Cordova included two office buildings, a hospital, two storehouses, one 11-stall roundhouse, one cinder pit barn, one galvanized iron warehouse and a general shop building which included a machine shop, paint shop, car shops and power plant. The equipment in the shops was adequate enough to service all the rolling stock used in the railroad operations and the large wharf adjoining the shop allowed for deliveries directly from barges to railroad cars. The company also provided housing by building a number of cabins along a street that became known as Railroad Row. These cabins were used by the superintendents and were all connected by a series of boardwalks to help avoid the muddy streets. The unmarried workmen were housed in large bunkhouses near the old cannery/headquarters site. Heney established a hospital in the old cannery buildings to serve the railroad crews. This photo came from the archives and collections of the Cordova Historical Society housed within the museum. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Stop by to see our new exhibit in the Copper River Gallery, “Winter White” featuring all local artists.

Museum Memories: Dec. 16, 2017

In the early days of construction of the Copper River and Northwest Railway, the company property in Cordova included two office buildings, a hospital,...
Cordova’s first city hall was an old wooden structure that dated back to 1935, but conveniently housed the administration, civil defense, fire and police departments as well as the local gymnasium. It was recognized in the late ’60s that improved facilities were needed to house the range of growing city functions in Cordova, along with the fact that basketballs bouncing steadily above office spaces left a little to be desired! And do you know what this building is now? Why, Bidarki Recreation Center.

Museum Memories: Dec. 9, 2017

Cordova’s first city hall was an old wooden structure that dated back to 1935, but conveniently housed the administration, civil defense, fire and police...
Did you feel that earthquake on Monday? Centered about 60 miles away, not too far from the 1964 Good Friday earthquake that struck the Prince William Sound Region on March 27. This magnitude 9.2 earthquake wrought major changes in the physical landscape of the Cordova and Prince William Sound area. Some structural damage occurred in town along the waterfront and there was one fatality at Point Whitshed; however, the tectonic uplift which took place had a much greater impact than was the case in some other Prince William Sound communities which suffered more structural damage. This photo shows some of the damage in Odiak Slough.

Museum Memories: Dec. 2, 2017

Did you feel that earthquake on Monday? Centered about 60 miles away, not too far from the 1964 Good Friday earthquake that struck the...
Katalla, southeast of Eyak was quick to take on the challenge of being the gateway to the region’s abundance of natural resources. In the late 1800s, Katalla was a trading post of sorts for the Eyak and Tlingit Natives with settlements in the area.

Museum Memories: Nov. 18, 2017

Katalla, southeast of Eyak was quick to take on the challenge of being the gateway to the region’s abundance of natural resources. In the...

Museum Memories: Nov. 11, 2017

In honor of Veterans Day, we share this photo from the Doc Chase collection.  This beautiful memorial constructed after World War I commemorated those...

Responsible decisions help everyone enjoy the outdoors

As we all settle into autumn, it’s time to start thinking again about the diverse uses of our local trail systems. Enjoying the trails...

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