Cordova Chronicles: A Halloween treat for Cordovans of all ages

Remember to look to the right rather than left

FNBA Branch Manager Cully Wooden and costumed Nicole Pallas look on as Mime Stacie Chappell expresses her Halloween delight at a new Main Street time and temperature clock. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times
FNBA Branch Manager Cully Wooden and costumed Nicole Pallas look on as Mime Stacie Chappell expresses her Halloween delight at a new Main Street time and temperature clock. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times

Time marches on, and once again Cordovans will be able to see its progress.

In a Halloween treat for everyone, on Oct. 31 First National Bank Alaska Cordova Branch Manager Cully Wooden and Operations Assistant Bryan Mills opened a large cardboard box outside their bank’s entrance just as young Trick-or-Treaters were emerging from next-door Children’s Pallas Daycare to begin their campaign for Main Street goodies.

Lo and behold, inside was a new time and temperature sign, which would be mounted atop the front of FNBA building by the next day. While the significance of the event may have been lost on the costumed tykes eager to score treats for immediate gratification, adults Stacie Chappell and Nicole Nothstine, both clad as super-size crayons, took time to admire the new signage before shepherding the Children’s Pallas troops inside FNBA for their first bounty of the day.

FNBA Operations Assistant Bryan Mills holds the door open as Children’s Pallas trick-or-treaters, guided by Loreene Pallas, head in to begin their Main Street Halloween visits. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times
FNBA Operations Assistant Bryan Mills holds the door open as Children’s Pallas trick-or-treaters, guided by Loreene Pallas, head in to begin their Main Street Halloween visits. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times

“With Cordova’s Main Street absent a time and temperature sign, First National Bank Alaska took the opportunity to add one back to the town’s landscape in another sign of the bank’s commitment to community,” a Nov. 1 FNBA press release stated.

The press release also added: “The significance of the sign may be lost on some people around the state,” said Cordova Branch Manager Cully Wooden, who recently celebrated her 25-year employment anniversary with the bank. “But Cordovans let us know how important it is, and I’m glad First National was able to provide it.”

Rumors are a small-town staple, and sometimes contain grains of truth. Following the demise of a similar long-standing sign on the opposite side of the street earlier this year, hearsay had it that another might soon appear.

Despite the onset of daylight savings time, the days are getting shorter. And sure enough, a savings institution has stepped up to help the city’s denizens figure out the time and temperature as they cruise down Main Street, at any time of the day or night.

On Nov. 1, the new FNBA time and temperature sign was up and running. Cordovans heading up town will have to remember to glance to the right, rather than left, to gather the data. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times
On Nov. 1, the new FNBA time and temperature sign was up and running. Cordovans heading up town will have to remember to glance to the right, rather than left, to gather the data. Photo by Dick Shellhorn/The Cordova Times

However, it may take Cordovans, of many habits and traditions, some time to realize they must now look to the right, rather than left, to garner this information that is much a part of their daily lives and conversation.

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Dick Shellhorn, author, reporter, ref and grandpa, can be reached at shorn@gci.net. Shellhorn was born and raised in Cordova, Alaska, and has lived there his entire life. He has been writing sports stories for the Cordova Times for over 40 years. In his Cordova Chronicles features, he writes about the history and characters of this Alaska town. Alaska Press Club awarded Shellhorn first place for Best Humor column in 2016.