Photo reflections on the Copper River Delta Shorebird Festival

By Eden McCall For The Cordova Times

Locals and visitors from across the world celebrated the migration of millions of shorebirds on the first weekend of May during the 32nd annual Copper River Delta Shorebird Festival.

A mixed group of dunlins, sandpipers and black-bellied plovers rest on the mudflats of the Copper River Delta during the second day of the festival, Friday, May 6. Photo courtesy of Railey Namitz
Festival mascot Maya the Shorebird and USFS Recreation Planner Erin Cole announce the release of a mission Cole created on the Agents of Discovery app to learn about the Copper River Delta’s wetlands and migratory shorebirds in time for this year’s festival. The public can download the free mobile app and experience geo-located challenges along Alaganik Road throughout May. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
Shorebird Festival begins with the grand opening of the International and Avian Art galleries Thursday evening, May 5. Visitors view art by local Alaskan artists, handmade birds from the Birds by Hand Project, and pieces sent from artists in Baja California, Mexico, which is another important site for migratory shorebirds. The gallery is open from May 5-28.
Photos courtesy of Eden McCall
Birders spot flocks of shorebirds at Hartney Bay on Friday, May 6. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
A western sandpiper forages after high tide Saturday morning at Hartney Bay as birders watch from the road.
Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
USFS Wildlife Biologist Erin Cooper presents about Cordova’s natural history, including the ecology of the Copper River Delta and its importance for migratory shorebirds, on Saturday, May 7 in the North Star Theatre for both virtual and in-person festival attendees. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
Erin Cooper, USFS Wildlife Biologist, captures photos and videos through a spotting scope of shorebirds at Hartney Bay on Saturday, May 7, to share on the Copper River Delta Shorebird Festival Facebook and Instagram pages. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
Fernando Angulo Pratolongo, a bird conservationist from Peru, and Ana Agreda, a wildlife biologist from Ecuador, finish surveying red knots on Little Egg Island on Sunday, May 8. The day prior, Pratolongo and Agreda presented about shorebird conservation and the importance of festivals in their countries in the Cordova Center. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall
The annual Pioneer Pie Social sells out of dozens of homemade pies in front of the Cordova Center on Sunday afternoon, May 8.
Photos courtesy of Eden McCall
The annual Pioneer Pie Social sells out of dozens of homemade pies in front of the Cordova Center on Sunday afternoon, May 8.
Photos courtesy of Eden McCall
Artists create Red Knot rugs using hand-dyed wool during a workshop at The Net Loft on Sunday, May 8. The Net Loft hosts multiple shorebird-themed art workshops Friday through Sunday, including making journals and needle felting. Photos courtesy of Eden McCall
On the last night of the festival, a flock of western sandpipers fly to another foraging spot on the mudflats at Hartney Bay after high tide Sunday evening, May 8. Photo courtesy of Eden McCall